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Egon Eiermann
Potsdam, Germany
When the German architect and designer Egon Eiermann (1904-1970) first made his name internationally at the Brussels World Exhibition with eight glass and steel pavilions created in collaboration with the Bauhaus architect Sep Ruf, he has already been on of the leading German architects. Before and during as well as after the war, he contributed to the construction of buildings of great importance for his country and his age. He became especially wellknown for the building of the new Gedächtnis-Kirche in Berlin, which became a symbol of West Berlin in the post-war years.

Egon Eiermann was a perfectionist to the smallest detail, and like several of his contemporary designers, he also created the interior for several of the buildings he constructed, including the furniture. Some of the early examples include the three-legged chair SE 42 from 1949, and the swivel chair SGB 197. His most important designs include the SE68 Muli purpose chair and not least the SE 18 Folding Chair, probably Eiermann’s most well-known chair ever, designed for the German producer Wilde + Spieth. The chair won The Good Design Award at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1953, and the silver medal at the Triennale in Milan in 1954. An obvious element of Eiermann’s view on design was the emphasis on both function and ergonomics, and he was uncompromising, when it came to finding the perfect form.