Your Cart

Explore the upholstery and frame options available for this piece at the bottom of this page.

$6,599 CAD

This item is a Special Order, which typically arrives in 8-9 weeks.

Email hello@average.is

Phone +1 855 439 4881

All orders over $79 have complementary delivery in the USA and Canada with express options available at checkout.

You may also select to pick-up any order at the Average Showroom — located at 1081 Queen St. W. in Toronto — during checkout at no charge.

International shipping is calculated at checkout.

Average Archive orders are only available for delivery in Toronto or pickup.

Review The Full Shipping Policy Here

For orders placed in Canada, customers will be subject to their Provincial and Federal sales taxes at checkout. Orders are not subject to any customs as the shipment is not leaving Canada.

Orders placed in the USA are shipped with pre-payed customs. You may still be subject to local sales taxes.

Customers outside of the USA and Canada will not be charged customs or taxes by Average. All prices shown are ex-VAT. Customers are subject to all local taxes, duties and import charges per their local jurisdiction.

Review The Full Shipping Policy

Standard items (not Special Order) can be returned via mail or in-store within 14 days of purchase provided the items are packaged and unused.

Special Order items, Archive items, items marked down, personal care and bath products are all final sale.

Review The Full Return Policy

Gropius’ two-seater F51-2 sofa and the F51-3 three-seater version evolved organically out of the F51 cube armchair in the director’s room of the Weimar Bauhaus. The floating cushions catch the eye alternately, as does the signature cantilever design which encompasses the upholstery – one could almost say, permeates it. The F51-2 and F51-3 sofas have close ties with Tecta. Erich Brendel corresponded with the company and was able to confirm that the F51 armchair already stood in the director’s room in the spring of 1920, but not the sofa.

There only exist a few photographs of the sofa group itself documenting the three-seater sofa. Tecta’s Axel Bruchhäuser recalls: “There is a photograph showing J. J. Pieter Oud, the Dutch De Stijl artist, with Wassily Kandinsky and Walter Gropius in the middle. It took the eyes of a detective to see that it was the three-seater.” Tecta also developed the elegant two-seater following the faithful reedition of the three-seater. In doing so, it pursued the programme of Walter Gropius’ constructivist modernism with the same radicality.

Axel Bruchhäuser, a Tecta partner since 1972, sees this as the dawn of a new era: “They started at zero after the complete moral, material and intellectual destruction wrought by the Great War. By founding the Bauhaus in 1919, he wanted to free himself from old conventions, rethink everything and be completely open for anything new.” In view of this radical entry into modernity, we really need to keep in mind that this new movement itself is now almost a century old.

One of the most impressive concepts is that of the cantilever chair championed at the Bauhaus, which builds a bridge all the way to El Lissitzky’s Cloud Irons of 1924. The radically new assumes a tangible form. Walter Gropius said: The goal of modern architecture is “to defy gravity and overcome the earth’s inertia in impression and appearance.” And this is a living example.

  • Walter Gropius, Germany (1920)
  • Solid Ash, Oak or Walnut in either clear lacquer or painted lacquered finish with selected textile or leather upholstery on foam
  • Made in Germany
  • Height 70cm / 27.6"
  • Depth 75cm / 29.5"
  • Width 170cm / 67"
  • Seat Height 42cm / 16.5"

Tecta F51-2 Options

Tecta Cavalry Cloth

Inspired by the tradition of the Bauhaus' legendary textile production, the Cavalry Cloth from Tecta is a staple wool upholstery available in timeless colours.

  • 100% Pure Wool
  • Durability Rating 40,000 Martindale

Kvadrat Hallingdal 65

By Nanna Ditzel

Kvadrat’s first textile ‘Hallingdal’ has become the archetype of woollen textiles. The very durable upholstery fabric was originally designed in 1965 by Nanna Ditzel, and is now available in a version with an updated colour scale: Hallingdal 65.

Hallingdal 65 is made of wool and viscose, which complement each other well: the wool provides excellent durability and flexibility, whilst the viscose adds brilliance and depth to the colour. Both materials are dyed before they are spun, which highlights the rich texture of the fabric.

  • 100% New Wool 
  • Made in Norway
  • Durability Rating 100,000 Martindale 
  • Pilling Rating 3-7
  • Lightfastness Rating 7

Kvadrat Harald 3

By Raf Simons & Fanny Aronsen

A closely-woven, very short-pile velour, Harald brings the fresh, soft texture of cotton to a directionless velvety textile. The intense colour offered by this matte velour places the focus strongly onto the silhouette of the upholstered object, emphasising its shape and contours.

Originally designed by Fanny Aronsen, Harald comes in a new colour palette conceived by Raf Simons offering a particularly large selection of vivid keynote tones, including primrose yellow, burnt orange, raspberry, lavender, aubergine and dark mint green, alongside more natural tones. Harald is a durable fabric suitable for use as curtains as well as in upholstery.

  • 100% Cotton
  • Made in Italy
  • Durability Rating 100,000 Martindale
  • Pilling Rating 4-5
  • Lightfastness Rating 6

Kvadrat Divina Melange 3

By Finn Skødt

Divina Melange is a textile characterised by its lack of texture and nap and consequently the fabric accentuates the dimensions of the furniture, giving prominence to the colours.

Melange means mixture. The original six grey and beige colourways are produced by mixing varying proportions of either black or brown wool with white wool. The different colours of wool are mixed before the garment is spun. 

The additional colourways have come about by dipping the two base colours in bold, virtually luminous pigments creating coloured melanges.

  • 100% New wool 
  • Made in the UK
  • Durability Rating 45,000 Martindale 
  • Pilling Rating 3
  • Lightfastness Rating 6-7

Kvadrat Vidar 3

By Raf Simons & Fanny Aronsen

Woven from bouclé yarns with a regular loop size, Vidar has a deep, tight, large-grained texture that lends itself particularly well to the graphic use of colour in upholstery. Originally designed by Fanny Aronsen, Vidar has been re-coloured by Raf Simons, with shades ranging from fresh jade green, raspberry pink and iris blue through to brick and earth tones, and easy neutrals.

The gentle satin surface finish of the weave contrasts with the deep shadowy tones in the depths, giving a multifaceted richness to the intense colours in the range. Tightly woven, without the irregularities of the other bouclé fabrics within this collection, Vidar has an inviting texture, which variously recalls blackberries, orange peel or the comforting close-knit texture of a favourite sweater.

  • 94% New wool, 6% Nylon
  • Made in Norway
  • Durability Rating 100,000 Martindale 
  • Pilling Rating 4
  • Lightfastness Rating 5-6

Tecta Leather 1

High quality, thick semi-aniline leather made from Central European cowhide tanned in correspondence with the ecological "Blauer Engel" Standard. 

Tecta Leather 3

Aniline leather refined. Nicknamed 'butter', this leather is especially soft, flat and protected by a wax-finish. Produced from first-class South German bull hides and tanned using minerals. 

Walter Gropius

Berlin, Germany

Founder and thinker of the Bauhaus philosophy. The architect and founder of the Bauhaus, Walter Gropius (1883-1969), mocked traditional architecture as “salon art”. He descended from a family of great builders: his great uncle was Martin Gropius. Walter Gropius abandoned his architectural studies and initially joined the office of Peter Behrens – as had, incidentally, Adolf Meyer, Mies van der Rohe and Le Corbusier. A short time later, Gropius founded what we now call modernism – a major break from and with the conventions of the past.

One key feature was that he did not reject the principles of the industrial age – standardisation and prototypes – but made them productive tools for his work. “A resolute affirmation of the living environment of machines and vehicles,” wrote the Bauhaus director in 1926, who believed that “the creation of standard types for all practical commodities of everyday use is a social necessity.”

This spirit not only gave rise to the Fagus factory as an icon of modern architecture and the Dessau Bauhaus, but also laid the foundations of what is still a driving force for us today. “The objective of creating a set of standard prototypes which meet all the demands of economy, technology, and form, requires the selection of the best, most versatile, and most thoroughly educated men who are well grounded in workshop experience and who are imbued with an exact knowledge of the design elements of form and mechanics and their underlying laws.”

By founding the Bauhaus, Gropius launched a new school of thought, opposing the traditional architecture of which he was so critical. In 1919 Gropius was appointed director of the Grand Ducal Saxon School of Arts and Crafts in Weimar, Thuringia, and named the new school “State Bauhaus Weimar”.

Gropius’ driving vision was not only to construct a “building of the future” and a holistic work of art, but also the highly modern approach of maintaining the distinction between apprentice and master while intermeshing the two teachings in a novel manner. To work across the disciplines, with an interdisciplinary approach in the spirit of research and experimentation.

Gropius also knew how to translate architectural concepts into furniture design, exemplified by his unique penetration of volume and linearity that characterises many of his works. Walter Gropius directed the Bauhaus until its closure in 1933, emigrated to England in 1934 and to Cambridge, USA, in 1937 to teach as professor of architecture at Harvard University.

View The Walter Gropius Collection

Walter Gropius

Germany

Walter Gropius (1888–1969) was the founder of the Bauhaus and a pioneer of modern architecture. In 1919, he was appointed to succeed Henry van de Velde as director of the School of Visual Arts in Weimar, which he renamed “Staatliches Bauhaus in Weimar”. In 1924, the Bauhaus moved to Dessau; Gropius designed the school building and the masters’ houses for the new location. In 1928, Gropius passed on the title of director to Swiss architect Hannes Meyer and became a self-employed architect in Berlin before emigrating to the United States in 1934. As a professor of architecture, he taught at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he founded The Architects’ Collaborative in 1941. In his political efforts to industrialize construction and create desperately needed residential spaces, Gropius captured the spirit of the times and influenced the work of numerous other architects.

View The Walter Gropius Collection

Tecta

Lauenförde, Germany

For over 40 years family-owned Tecta’s mission and responsibility has been to preserve and review the best ideas and designs of modernism as created by the Bauhaus movement in Weimar or Dessau while being driven by the desire to think forward, enhance and adapt them.

Tecta unites craftsmanship, values and family tradition with the Bauhaus school of thought. This is what makes the company so unique with its cycle of developing and cherishing what the Bauhaus movement once taught and merged with traditional craftsmanship. Both today and yesterday.

View The Tecta Collection