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In 1931 Mies van der Rohe applied for a patent for a “multifunctional lounge chair”. It was to be both ergonomic and elegant, cantilevered and suspended, suitable for both indoor and outdoor use.

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s verdict on Stam’s chair: ‘Ugly, something really ugly, with these couplings. If he had at least made it rounder – that would have looked better’ – and he drew an arc. Simply an arc in his own hand added to the Stam sketch – that made the new chair.”

Only one thing was missing to complement its extraordinary form: the seat and its covering. That’s where Lilly Reich stepped in – an interior designer, who worked in Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s office from 1926. She and Mies came up with the idea of using wickerwork for the Weißenhof chair. Together with a master basket maker, Reich developed the new aesthetic that perfected the expansive chair as a holistic work of art.

To this day, the suspended F42E lounge chair condenses the moment of flying in a piece of furniture that looks like a flapping wing, its silhouette exuding functionality, aesthetics and restraint. While its counterpart, the adjustable F42-1E with the same lying space, quotes the swinging lines of the cantilever chair in its cantilever frame.

The reclining chairs were designed by Mies van der Rohe for a villa ensemble in Krefeld. The buildings have now become well-known museums: Haus Lange and Haus Esters, located right next to each other on Wilhelmshofer Allee in Krefeld. They were commissioned by the founders of the united silk weaving factories Hermann Lange and Josef Esters and were intended as private homes for their families. In 1930 Mies van der Rohe completed these linear, almost Japanese looking buildings and sketched the lounge chairs with a spring suspension for them, which were supplemented by Tecta. They both feature the cantilever frame and are still manufactured by Tecta today, bearing Oskar Schlemmer’s label for faithfully reedited Bauhaus furniture.

The B42 is produced by Tecta under an official licence granted by Lilly Reich's family.

  • Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Germany (1931)
  • Nickel-Plated Steel frame with wicker, stainless steel cord
  • Made in Germany
  • Height 104cm / 41"
  • Depth 130cm / 51"
  • Width 56cm / 22"
  • Cord Length: 8m/26' (can be adjusted)
  • Notes Nickel-Plated Steel will slightly patina over time. Includes plastic and felt glides. Cushion not included. Maximum weight 110kg/230lbs. 

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

Aachen, Germany

Master of the beautiful form. Born in 1886, as the son of a Catholic stonemason family in Aachen, he is still considered one of the most important architects of modernism today. With a single brushstroke he could make buildings fly and design oscillating furniture. The man who designed the famous Barcelona Pavilion and Villa Tugendhat in Brno. 

“The art of building is man’s spatial dialogue with his environment and demonstrates how he asserts himself therein and how he masters it,” said Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.

To this day, his understanding of architecture is reflected by his ground-breaking buildings and furniture. “The Miesian city is implicit in the Miesian chair,” commented Peter Smithson.

After collaborating on the seat of the Weißenhof chair in 1926, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe continued to work with interior designer Lilly Reich two years later. Following the success of the Stuttgart Werkbund Exhibition, they became the artistic directors of the German section of the World Exhibition in Barcelona. There Mies van der Rohe built the famous Barcelona Pavilion.

In 1930 Ludwig Mies van der Rohe was appointed director of the Bauhaus in Dessau. Under the Nazi regime he experienced a time full of painful compromises, leading to the Bauhaus’ closure on 10 August 1933. Eventually, Mies van der Rohe emigrated to the United States, where he built the world-famous Farnsworth House in 1951, followed by the Seagram Building in New York in 1958. Ludwig Mies van der Rohe died in Chicago in 1969, as one of the unequalled architects of modernism.

View The Ludwig Mies van der Rohe Collection

Tecta

Lauenförde, Germany

For over 40 years family-owned Tecta’s mission and responsibility has been to preserve and review the best ideas and designs of modernism as created by the Bauhaus movement in Weimar or Dessau while being driven by the desire to think forward, enhance and adapt them.

Tecta unites craftsmanship, values and family tradition with the Bauhaus school of thought. This is what makes the company so unique with its cycle of developing and cherishing what the Bauhaus movement once taught and merged with traditional craftsmanship. Both today and yesterday.

View The Tecta Collection